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Family planning clinics
STD/HIV clinics

 
Michigan Department of Health High-Risk Hepatitis B Vaccination Program
Program name: Michigan Department of Health High-Risk Hepatitis B Vaccination Program
Population served: Program is available to clients served at local health departments, family planning clinics, STD clinics, and teen health centers that are currently enrolled in the High Risk Hepatitis A and B Program.
Eligibility: Adolescents and adults of any age regardless of insurance status who are household and/or sexual contacts of hepatitis A and/or B virus infected persons, people with more than one sex partner in the last six months, a male who has sex with other males; people seeking evaluation or treatment for a sexually transmitted disease; an injecting drug user, or a non-injecting methamphetamine user; people with acute or chronic liver disease; and people with HIV infection.
Region served: Statewide Michigan
Funding: State funds and federal VFC funds (for eligible clients through age 18)
Program started: March 1999, ended 2003. Funding for program began again 1/1/05 and was modified to include hepatitis A vaccine on October 1, 2007.
Number of clients: 1,059 first doses, 889 second doses, and 876 third doses of hepatitis B vaccine were administered in state funded sexually transmitted disease clinics in 2006.
Contact: Patricia A.Vranesich, R.N. B.S.N.
Section Manager Education/Outreach
Division of Immunization
Michigan Dept. of Community Health
201 Townsend
Lansing, MI. 48909
Phone: (517) 335-8641
Email: vranesichp@michigan.gov
Website: www.michigan.gov/immunize
IAC is not responsible for content found on other websites.
Description:

The focus of the program is vaccination against hepatitis and hepatitis B. Educational brochures are provided to the clinics. We feel that the program is very successful with high clinic participation.

Through Michigan's Vaccine Replacement Program (MI-VRP), we also offer hepatitis A and B vaccines to clients 19 years of age and older seen at a local health department, Federally Qualified Health Center, or migrant health center who are uninsured or underinsured. The eligibility criteria for hepatitis A vaccination are: a household and/or sexual contact of a hepatitis A virus infected person; a man who has sex with other men; a person with an acute or chronic liver disease; an injecting drug user or a non-injecting methamphetamine user. The eligibility criteria for hepatitis B vaccination are: a household and/or sexual contact of a hepatitis B surface antigen positive-person; a sexually active person who is not in a long-term monogamous relationship (e.g., a person with more than one sex partner during the previous six months); a person seeking evaluation or treatment for a sexually transmitted disease, a man who has sex with other men; a current or recent injection drug user, a person with end-stage renal disease, predialysis, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or home dialysis; a person with acute or chronic liver disease, or a person with HIV infection.

The primary barrier for clinic staff is "time." The primary reason for why respondents would not accept the vaccines was that the individual did not have enough information about the disease or vaccine. Barriers appeared to become irrelevant when information was provided. Secondary reasons for not accepting the vaccine related to fear including fear of needles/shots, fear of the vaccine itself, and fear of discovering they already had the disease and the time and inconvenience associated with receiving the vaccine. The most common reason for not returning to complete the series was forgetting.

Michigan also has another website that offers information on viral hepatitis, HIV, STDs, and the Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention Program Manual. www.michigan.gov/hivstd


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