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Hep Express Issue 14

ABBREVIATIONS: ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; DVH, Division of Viral Hepatitis; HAV, hepatitis A virus; HBV, hepatitis B virus; HCV, hepatitis C virus; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; IDU, injection drug user; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; MSM, men who have sex with men; STD, sexually transmitted disease; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; WHO, World Health Organization.
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February 18, 2004
KIDS WITH HEPATITIS CAN GO TO CAMP!

[The following is cross posted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "IAC EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 2/09/04.]

Children with hepatitis B or C will have a chance to attend camp this summer at two of the top U.S. medical camps, thanks to the national nonprofit organization PKIDs (Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases) and Paul Newman's Association of Hole In The Wall Gang Camps.

PKIDs, which supports families touched by viral hepatitis and HIV/AIDS, has acquired a number of slots for children with chronic hepatitis B or C at camps in upstate New York (Double "H" Hole in the Woods Ranch in Lake Luzerne) and Florida (Boggy Creek Gang Camp in Eustis). The camps specialize in providing a fun, traditional summer camp experience for children and teens with medical needs.

Children must be between the ages of 6 and 16 and must be receiving medical treatment of any kind. PKIDs and the camps will pay travel and camp costs for qualified children--the families pay nothing. Any parent, caretaker, physician, or health care worker interested in sending a child to either camp should contact PKIDs for an application at pkids@pkids.org (email) or (877) 557-5437. Completed applications are due at the PKIDs' office by March 31. PKIDs is also seeking donations to help pay the costs of sending children to the two camps. If you are interested in sponsoring a child at camp, please email or call PKIDs at the email address or phone number above.

For more information, call PKIDs at (360) 695-0293 or go to http://www.pkids.org

To visit the website of the Double "H" Hole in the Woods Ranch, go to: http://www.doublehranch.org

To visit the website of the Boggy Creek Gang Camp, go to: http://www.boggycreek.org
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February 18, 2004
NASTAD "HIV PREVENTION BULLETIN" REPORTS ON THE BENEFITS OF SERVICE INTEGRATION

The February 2004 issue of the "HIV Prevention Bulletin" published by NASTAD (National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors) focuses on the benefits of integrating viral hepatitis services into STD and HIV clinics.

The first article, "Can Integrating Hepatitis Services in an STD Clinic Encourage New Clients? Experience from a NYC STD Clinic, May 2000-August 2003," discusses the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's experience with offering hepatitis services at an STD clinic. The data suggest that integrating hepatitis services (including hepatitis A and B vaccination and hepatitis B and C counseling and testing) appeared to be an incentive for IDU clients to visit the clinic and utilize traditional STD services. The clinic found that almost 60% of the IDUs visiting the clinic from May 2000-August 2003 did so specifically to receive hepatitis services; however, many of these clients were also at risk of or infected with HIV and other STDs.

"Hepatitis C (HCV) Testing as an Incentive to Increase HIV Testing among IDUs in California" reported on a demonstration project supported by the California Office of AIDS and CDC. Five sites in California were chosen to be part of the project. The goal was to evaluate the use of HCV counseling and testing (C&T)as an incentive to attract larger numbers of IDUs into HIV C&T services. All five sites found that more IDUs participated in HIV C&T when HCV C&T was also offered. This result supported what has long been suspected: IDUs are less interested in HIV and increasingly concerned about HCV and therefore HCV testing may serve as a hook to bring IDUs into public health settings where they can access additional services.

A third article details the specifics of using HIV prevention dollars to support HCV testing.

To access the February 2004 issue, go to:
http://www.nastad.org/documents/public/pub_prevention/
200423February2004HVPreventionBulletin.pdf

The "HIV Prevention Bulletin" is free and often includes information about viral hepatitis in groups at high risk. To receive this free electronic publication, please send an email to: nastad@nastad.org

Please provide your name, position, agency, address, email address, and phone number.
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February 18, 2004
NEW WEBSITE PROVIDES COMMUNITY NEEDLE AND SYRINGE DISPOSAL INFORMATION

Millions of people use hypodermic needles (and syringes) every day in their homes and other places in the community. Making sure that these needles are safely disposed of is a high priority to protect workers and the public from needlestick injuries.

Each state and territory has its own laws and regulations on acceptable approaches for community disposal of needles and other sharps. These rules can be hard to find and interpret. To help people sort through this maze and learn about what communities are doing to promote safe disposal, the Academy for Education Development (AED) has surveyed all the states and territories and put the results on a new website called Safe Community Needle Disposal.

This website is designed for anyone interested in safe needle disposal, including people with diabetes, others who use syringes to inject medicines, injection drug users, pharmacists, diabetes educators, health care providers, health departments, and community organizations. It focuses on needles used in the home and other community settings, not on those used in health care settings (hospitals, physicians' offices, clinics).

All state and territory profiles on the website have been reviewed and approved by a representative of the state or territorial government. As of February 2004, more than half of the state profiles have been posted on the website. As the remaining states and territories approve their profiles, the profiles will be added to the website.

CDC sponsored the AED project that created this website.

To visit this new resource, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/needledisposal
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February 18, 2004
CDC, AAP, and AAFP PUBLISH "RECOMMENDED CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENT IMMUNIZATION SCHEDULE--UNITED STATES, JANUARY-JUNE 2004"

CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) published "Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule--United States, January-June 2004." The schedule appears in the January 16 issue of the "MMWR QuickGuide," the January issue of "Pediatrics," an AAP journal, and the January issue of "American Family Physician," an AAFP journal. The schedule was approved by ACIP, AAP, and AAFP.

As was the case in 2003, the 2004 schedule includes a catch-up schedule for children who fall behind or start their immunizations late. In addition, this year, a mid-year schedule will be released describing new additional recommendations.

One change relates to the recommendation for the minimum age for the last dose in the hepatitis B vaccination schedule. The last dose in the vaccination series should not be administered before age 24 weeks (updating the previous recommendation not to administer the last dose before age 6 months).

To access a web-text (HTML) version of the complete "MMWR QuickGuide" article, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5301-Immunizationa1.htm

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of this issue of MMWR, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5301.pdf

Receive a FREE electronic subscription to MMWR (which includes new ACIP statements) by going to
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrsubscribe.html

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the 2004 schedule and catch-up schedule from the CDC website, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/recs/child-schedule.htm#Printable and select the format you want.

To access the related AAP policy statement, go to:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/113/1/142

To access the related AAFP practice guidelines, which includes a link to the 2004 schedule, go to:
http://www.aafp.org/afp/20040101/practice.html
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February 18, 2004
HARM REDUCTION COALITION PUBLISHES NEW HEPATITIS C RESOURCE

The Harm Reduction Coalition has released a new 32-page booklet for people who use drugs and want more information about hepatitis C. The booklet explains what hepatitis C is, how it affects the liver, how people get infected and pass the virus to others, things you can do to prevent or reduce the risk of infection, how to find out if you have hepatitis C, and steps to take in order to protect your health if you have hepatitis C.

This resource can be downloaded free at
http://www.harmreduction.org/hepCbrochure.pdf

The Harm Reduction Coalition has other resources available on their website at http://www.harmreduction.org, including "The Straight Dope" series of safe injection pamphlets, which provides practical harm reduction suggestions for drug users.
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February 18, 2004
JANUARY ISSUE OF "NEEDLE TIPS" HAS BEEN MAILED AND IS ON THE WEB

The hard copy of the new "NEEDLE TIPS and the Hepatitis B Coalition News" has arrived in the mail boxes of 130,000 health professionals and others who work in the field of immunization. If you haven't received yours, you can access the entire issue or selected articles from the IAC website. Immunization and hepatitis experts at CDC have reviewed each article and education piece in the issue for accuracy (with the exception of editorials).

Among the materials available for photocopying is the newly released "Recommended Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Schedule--United States, January-June 2004." The January issue has several practical pieces on storing and administering vaccines, including "CDC's Guidelines for Maintaining and Managing the Vaccine Cold Chain," "Vaccine Handling Tips," "Temperature Logs (Fahrenheit and Celsius) for Vaccines," and "Administering Vaccines: Dose, Route, Site, and Needle Size." The issue also includes three hepatitis resources: an editorial, "Prevent Viral Hepatitis: Vaccinate!"; an updated patient-education piece, "Every Week Hundreds of Sexually Active People Get Hepatitis B"; and a new professional-education piece, "Standing Orders for Administering Hepatitis B Vaccine to Adolescents and Adults."

HOW TO READ "NEEDLE TIPS" ON THE WEB
You can download the entire issue from the Web or view selected articles from the table of contents below.

To view the table of contents with links to individual articles, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nt

Please note: The PDF file of the entire January 2004 issue, linked below, is large at 744,318 bytes. Some printers cannot print such a large file. For tips on downloading and printing PDF files, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/tips.htm

To download the entire PDF version of the January 2004 issue, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n29/n29.pdf
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February 18, 2004
NEW: 8TH EDITION OF "EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION OF VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES" (THE "PINK BOOK") NOW AVAILABLE

[The following is cross posted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "IAC EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 2/09/04.]

The 8th edition of "Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases," widely known as the "Pink Book," is now available in print for purchase and online for free downloading.

A comprehensive source of current epidemiologic data and vaccine recommendations, the 8th edition includes a new chapter on meningococcal disease.

The cost of the "Pink Book" is $29 plus shipping and handling. To order a copy, choose one of the following methods: call (877) 252-1200 or (800) 418-7246 between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm ET; send a fax order with credit card or purchase order information to (301) 843-0159; or visit the Public Health Foundation (PHF) bookstore at: http://bookstore.phf.org/prod171.htm

To print a ready-to-copy (PDF) format of the entire "Pink Book" or selected chapters, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/pink
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February 18, 2004
CALIFORNIA INTER-COUNTY HEPATITIS C TASK FORCE CONFERENCE TO BE HELD IN SAN JOSE, MARCH 18-19, 2004

The 3rd California Inter-County Hepatitis C Task Force Conference is scheduled for March 18-19, 2004, at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center. The California Hepatitis C Task Force is a volunteer driven, nonprofit organization committed to improving the health of the public infected and affected by hepatitis C.

For more information or registration materials, go to the Task Force website at http://www.californiahcvtaskforce.org


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