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Hep Express Issue 21

ABBREVIATIONS: ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; DVH, Division of Viral Hepatitis; HAV, hepatitis A virus; HBV, hepatitis B virus; HCV, hepatitis C virus; IAC, Immunization Action Coalition; IDU, injection drug user; MMWR, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; MSM, men who have sex with men; STD, sexually transmitted disease; VIS, Vaccine Information Statement; WHO, World Health Organization.
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September 16, 2004
AUGUST 2004 ISSUE OF "VACCINATE WOMEN" IS ON THE IAC WEBSITE

[The following is excerpted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "IAC EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 8/30/04.]

The August 2004 issue of "VACCINATE WOMEN" is now available on the IAC website. Hard copies were recently mailed to all members of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). This publication was supported by a cooperative grant by the Division of Viral Hepatitis at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was distributed free of charge by ACOG.

The new issue is filled with reliable, practical information intended to assist obstetricians/gynecologists in providing immunization services in their health care settings.

To view the table of contents with links to individual articles, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vw

Please note: The PDF file of the entire issue, linked below, is large at 502,491 bytes. For tips on downloading and printing PDF files, go to: http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/tips.htm

To download a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the entire issue, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/vw/vw0804.pdf
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September 16, 2004
HBF ADDS PRESENTATION BY DR. HAROLD MARGOLIS TO ITS ONLINE EXPERT SPEAKERS FORUM

The Hepatitis B Foundation (HBF) has added a presentation by Harold Margolis, MD, to its online Expert Speakers Forum. Dr. Margolis recently retired as the Director of the Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC. He is currently working at the Emory Vaccine Center in Atlanta before moving to Seoul, Korea, where he will direct the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

Dr. Margolis's presentation is titled "Viral Hepatitis—A National Perspective: Closing the Gaps." The speech provides an overview of viral hepatitis prevention programs in the United States, and addresses the need to develop a strategy for eliminating viral hepatitis in the United States and around the world.

The Expert Speakers Forum includes both audio/video and printer-friendly text versions of each presentation. To access "Viral Hepatitis—A National Perspective: Closing the Gaps," click here.
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September 16, 2004
CDC WEB PAGE ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT HIV AND HCV COINFECTION

CDC's Divisions of HIV/AIDS Prevention offers a detailed Q & A web page titled "Frequently Asked Questions and Answers About Coinfection with HIV and Hepatitis C Virus." About one quarter of HIV-infected persons in the United States are also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV infection progresses more rapidly to liver damage in HIV-infected persons, and may also affect the course and management of HIV infection.

To view a text version of this document, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/facts/HIV-HCV_Coinfection.htm

To download in ready-to-copy (PDF) format, go to:
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/facts/HIV-HCV_Coinfection.pdf
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September 16, 2004
AASLD ANNUAL MEETING TO BE HELD OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 2, IN BOSTON

The American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) is holding its annual meeting in Boston on October 29-November 2, 2004.

For more information about "The Liver Meeting," or to register online, go to: http://www.aasld.org
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September 16, 2004
NATIONAL COALITION OF STD DIRECTORS TO MEET IN BALTIMORE, OCTOBER 6-8

The 8th Annual Meeting of the National Coalition of STD Directors will be held October 6-8, 2004, at the Wyndham Baltimore Inner Harbor in Baltimore. The meeting will provide an opportunity for members to participate in training. It will also include sessions on increasing program capacity in the areas of surveillance, evaluation, and integration, and discussions on viral STDs and MSM issues.

For more information, go to: http://www.ncsddc.org
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September 16, 2004
UPDATE: IAC REVISES ITS PATIENT-EDUCATION SHEET "VACCINATIONS FOR ADULTS: YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO GET IMMUNIZED!"

[The following is cross posted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "IAC EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 9/7/04.]

IAC recently revised its one-page patient-education sheet "Vaccinations for Adults: You're NEVER too old to get immunized!" The updated sheet presents a chart of the eight vaccines commonly given to adults, gives information about the age groups for which the various vaccines are indicated, and discusses the dosing schedule. Health professionals can save time by asking patients to read it while they are waiting to be seen.

To access a ready-to-copy (PDF) version of the updated sheet, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4030a.pdf

To access a web-text (HTML) version, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/nslt.d/n18/p4030new.htm
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September 16, 2004
MICHIGAN HAS DISTRIBUTED 300,000 ADULT IMMUNIZATION RECORD CARDS—IAC URGES YOU TO DISTRIBUTE THEM, TOO!

[The following is cross posted from the Immunization Action Coalition's "IAC EXPRESS" electronic newsletter, 8/16/04.]

The Michigan Department of Community Health must believe in making it easy for Michigan adults to keep track of their vaccination status. In the past few years, the department has distributed more than 300,000 IAC adult immunization record cards.

"We love the IAC adult immunization record cards," said Rosemary Franklin, the immunization division's information and education coordinator. Why? One big reason is that it gives adult patients a PERMANENT record of their immunizations. At times, this can be invaluable. For example, if a person sustains a wound and is brought to a hospital emergency room that has no access to vaccination records, the person can refer to their immunization record card to find out their tetanus-diphtheria vaccination status.

Another reason is that the canary-yellow card, which is small enough to fit in a wallet, is easy to spot. "The card is bright, easy to find, and virtually indestructible," Franklin said. "One of my co-workers added a card to a load of laundry, and it came out legible and intact!"

How to use the card
In addition to being a foolproof way to help patients keep track of their vaccination status, the record card is an inexpensive educational tool. The card lists seven vaccines that all adults or certain adults should receive. Health care professionals (HCPs) can use it during patient encounters to discuss a patient's vaccination status with them. At the end of the visit, the HCP gives the card to the patient and encourages them to refer to it to find out when they're due for their next Td booster, a pneumococcal vaccine dose, or other vaccination.

Almost 2 million cards shipped
The Adult Immunization Record Card was developed by IAC in collaboration with CDC and several state health departments. Since introducing it in May 2002, IAC has shipped more than 1.8 million cards to health care providers across the United States.

To view a color image of the bright yellow, rip-proof, smudge-proof, waterproof card, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/adultizcards/adultizcard.pdf

Cost and ordering information
The cost for one 250-count box is $30; two boxes (500 cards), $55; three boxes (750 cards), $75; four boxes (1,000 cards), $90. Additional pricing for larger quantities can be found on the online order form (see link below). NOTE: THE FIRST ORDER OF A 250-CARD BOX COMES WITH A 30-DAY MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE.

To order IAC's Adult Immunization Record Cards online (including online with a purchase order), go to:
https://www.immunize.org/adultizcards

To print an order form to send with payment information by fax or mail, go to:
http://www.immunize.org/adultizcards/izorder.pdf

If you have questions about IAC's Adult Immunization Record Card, call us at (651) 647-9009, or email us at admin@immunize.org (Use the same email address to receive sample cards.)
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September 16, 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLES YOU MAY HAVE MISSED

The following recent journal articles present research related to viral hepatitis prevention or treatment.

"Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Infection and Perception of Antibody Status Among Male Prison Inmates in the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission in Prisons Study Cohort, Australia"
Authors: Gates JA, Post JJ, Kaldor JM, Pan Y, Haber PS, Lloyd AR, Dolan KA
Source: Journal of Urban Health, September 2004, Vol. 81(3):448-452
Click here for abstract

"Injection Drug Use and the Hepatitis C Virus: Considerations for a Targeted Treatment Approach—the Case Study of Canada"
Authors: Fischer B, Haydon E, Rehm J, Krajden M, Reimer J
Source: Journal of Urban Health, September 2004, Vol. 81(3):428-447
Click here for abstract

"Randomized Controlled Trial of a Brief Behavioural Intervention for Reducing Hepatitis C Virus Risk Practices Among Injecting Drug Users"
Authors: Tucker T, Fry CL, Lintzeris N, Baldwin S, Ritter A,
Donath S, Whelan G
Source: Addiction, September 2004, Vol. 99(9):1157-1166
Click here for abstract

"The Prevalence and the Risk Behaviours Associated with the Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus in Australian Correctional Facilities"
Authors: Hellard ME, Hocking JS, Crofts N
Source: Epidemiology and Infection, June 2004, Vol. 132(3):409-415
Click here for abstract


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