Hepatitis A, B, and C Prevention Programs
Information and Programs for Adults and Adolescents at Risk
 
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Programs for other populations at risk

 
Texas Department of Health Hepatitis A Vaccine Initiative
Program name: Texas Department of Health Hepatitis A Vaccine Initiative
Population served: Children living in areas with high rates of hepatitis A disease
Eligibility: Children 2 through 18 years of age
Region served: Selected counties in Texas
Funding: Combined federal and state funds
Program started: 1997
Number of clients: In 2001, 543,659 doses of hepatitis A vaccine were administered to children in Texas, whereas in 2002, 556,319 doses were administered.
Contact: Rita Espinoza, MPH
Texas Department of Health
1100 W. 49th Street
Austin, TX 78756
Phone: (512) 458-7284
Fax: (512) 458-7544
Email: rita.espinoza@tdh.state.tx.us
Website: www.ImmunizeTexas.com
IAC is not responsible for content found on other websites.
Description:
Since 1990, Texas counties along the Mexico border collectively had an annual rate of hepatitis A disease that averaged 37 cases per 100,000 population. Children 1 year through 9 years of age experienced hepatitis A at a rate as high as 205 cases per 100,000 population (Maverick County). Six border counties had rates of disease among children >100 cases per 100,000, and 12 counties had rates of disease in children in the 40-100 cases per 100,000 range. Consequently, priority for vaccination against hepatitis A was first given to these border counties. [A “border county” is defined as a county any part of which was within 100 kilometers of Mexico.]

Effective August 1999, children attending public or private school or a licensed child-care facility in any of 32 border counties were required to be vaccinated against hepatitis A or to show serologic proof of immunity to hepatitis A. Effective August 2003, 7 additional counties will be added to the list of those counties in which hepatitis A vaccine is required. These include Bexar, Grayson, Moore, Nueces, Potter, Randall, and Terry counties.

In June 2000, 22 additional counties in Texas that also had high rates of hepatitis A disease in children were included in the Texas hepatitis A vaccine initiative. The hepatitis A vaccine is not, however, required for school entry or day-care enrollment in these counties, but the vaccine is strongly recommended and encouraged for children living in these counties.

In 2001, the Texas Department of Health developed a standard methodology to identify counties with high incidence of hepatitis A disease and received approval to use the methodology in December 2001. This methodology involves calculating the incidence of disease over a moving 10-year period and categorizes counties into one of the following designations:

REQUIRED: The mean and median incidence rates are greater than or equal to 20 cases per 100,000 population.

RECOMMENDED: The mean incidence is greater than or equal to 20 cases per 100,000 population, and the median incidence is greater than 10 but less than 20, or

The mean incidence is greater than or equal to 10 but less than 20, and the median incidence is greater than or equal to 10 cases per 100,000.

Although this methodology was used to require hepatitis A vaccine in 7 additional counties, the Texas Department of Health is currently assessing its financial resources to determine if the hepatitis A vaccine recommendation can be expanded into additional counties.

Immunization Action Coalition
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